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April 4, 2012     Indian Valley Record
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8A Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Indian Valley Record Children enjoy splashing in the community pool last year, but $5,000 is needed by May 1 in order to open it this year. Photo by Alicia Knadler $ 5,000 needed to open pool Alicia Knadler Indian Valley Editor aknadler@plumasnews.com Residents and business owners are asked to help open the Indian Valley Community Pool this year, which will take $5,000. Indian Valley Recreation' and Parks District directors appointed a committee to operate the pool, and mem- bers are working hard to raise the money by May 1. They are selling member- ships now, and will gladly accept donations, which can be tax deductible. Membership levels are as follows: Early bird members who join before June 1 may do so for $120, and $8 for each additional family member. After that, memberships will be $140, and $10 for each additional family member. Individuals can join for $60 before June 1, and $70 after. There will also be lower daily admission. It costs more than $10,000 each summer for pool oper- ations and maintenance. Unlike other recreation districts, Indian Valley does not receive any tax money. All programming is de- pendent on private funds, through fundraising efforts and fees for programs. At the pool, this money comes from admission, memberships and classes such as swim lessons and. water aerobics. Committee members would like to develop more programs, like classes for seniors and individuals with disabilities. "It will take the whole community to get the pool open this year," committee member Doti McDowell said. For more information or to help, call Doti McDowell at 284-7532. Opportunities for education funding American Iris Society Scholarship, $500 Open to high school seniors in Northern California pursu- ing a career in horticulture, landscaping, nursery produc- tion or related field. For appli- cation, contact high school counselor. Deadline: April 6. Northern California Golf Association, $4,000 - $5,OOO Eleven scholarships avail- able to high school seniors (9.0 GPA required) who plan to at- tend a four-year college or university. Based on merit and need. For application, vis- it Youth on Course at youthoncourse.org. Deadline: April 13. Plumas District Hospital Volunteers Scholarship, $2,000. Two scholarships available to residents or high school graduates within Plumas Hos- pital District who are pursu- ing a career in health care. Applicants must have com- pleted at least one year of aca- demic studies in a health-re- lated curriculum or one year of employment in a health re- lated program. Applications available at pdh.org (select Volunteers from left menu, then Scholarships from right menu) and frc.edu/financial aid/types.htm#Scholarships. GETTING AN EDUCATION For information, call scholar- ship chairwoman Helen Ettinger, 283-3621. Deadline: April 13. California Retired Teachers Association Division 76, $500 Three scholarships avail- able to local high school se- niors with a 3.0 GPA who plan to attend college, university, junior college or trade school. Requires a one-page biogra- phy. Obtain application from high school counselor's office. Deadline: April 18. Plumas County Bar Associ- ation, $1,000 Preference given to a Plumas County high school .senior attending a four-year college or university. Five hundred word essay required. Obtain application from high school counselor's office. Deadline: April 27. Cien Amigos - IME Becas Scholarship Fund, $1,000 Fifty scholarships available to high school seniors from low-income households of Mexican/Latino heritage who plan to enroll at a public or private university or college. Must have GPA of 2.5 or higher. Obtai n applica- tion from high school coun- selor's Office or visit 100amigos-imebecas.org. Deadline: April 30: Cien Amigos - IME Becas High School Grants, $300 One hundred grants avail- able to high school juniors and seniors from low-income households of Mexi- can/Latino heritage for finan- cial support for college appli- cation or SAT fees. Must have GPA of 2.5 or higher. Obtain application from high school counselor's office or visit 100amigos-infebecas.org. Deadline: April 30. Plumas-Sierra Cattle- Women Scholarship, $1,000 Open to students whose ma- jor income is agriculture-re- lated, or who are majoring in agriculture-related field. Stu- dents may apply for a second- year award of $500. Printed applications available in Plumas and Sierra county schools. Completed applica- tion must be sent to scholar- ship chairwoman Maureen Kimberling, P.O. Box 356, Chilcoot, CA 96105; phone 993- 4036. Deadline: April 30. Reno High Sierra Chapter Ninety-Nines Scholarship, $5,OOO Open to all current female student pilots working on a private pilot certificate. To apply, visit renohighsierra 99s.org. Deadline: April 30 Aspiring Animation Profes- sional Scholarship, $1,000 Open to high school seniors interested in an animation-re- lated career. Requires applica- tion and essay. May be used to attend any accredited school or college. For application, visit AnimationCareer Review.com. Deadline: May 1. Plumas Association of Re- altors Leonard H.A. Franz Scholarship, $600 Open to high school seniors with a 3.0 GPA who plan to at- tend a two- or four-year col- lege or vocational school. Community service or work experience desired. For appli- cation, contact high school counselor. Deadline: May 9. Youth Automobile Safety Scholarship, $250 - $1,500 Open to high school seniors whose parents are full-time or retired public employees. Re- quires essay about ways to re- duce accident rates among teenagers. To apply, visit cseinsurance.comTscholarship. htm. Deadline: May 11. Bill to repeal fire tax passes committee North State Assemblyman and Chief Republican Whip Dan Logue announced last week that a bill he coau- thored to repeal the "fire tax" has passed its first commit- tee. Assembly Bill 1506, au- thored by Assemblyman Kevin Jeffries, was approved by the Assembly Committee on Natural Resources with strong bipartisan support. "It is encouraging to see Democrats and Republi- cans in agreement on this issue," said Logue. "Rural homeowners should not have to suffer another oppressive tax." Assembly Bill 1506 will re- peal the state responsibility area fire prevention fee (aka the fire tax) that was passed last year as part of the major- ity party budget. In January the state Board of Forestry and Fire Protection enacted regulations for the collection of $150 for each "habitable structure" on a property owner's land. The Howard Jarvis Tax- payers Association an- nounced that it would sue to stop the implementation of this fee because it violates the California Constitution as an illegally enacted tax. The bill enacting the fire tax was passed without the re- quired two-thirds vote for new taxes and fees. "Even Democrats are beginning to realize that this tax is not what the governor said it would be," Logue explained. "Rural homeown- ers already pay for fire protection through property taxes, income taxes and local fire district assessments, so this is plain and simple an unfair tax." AB 1506 will have its next hearing before the Assembly Appropriations Committee in April. Logue represents the Califor- nia Legislature's 3rd Assem- bly District, which includes the communities of Butte, Lassen, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sierra and Yuba. MMUNITY CORNER WEEKLY CALENDAR Thursday, April 5 WIC Program, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Indian Valley Resource Center, Main St., Greenville, 283-4093 or 1-800-WIC-4093. Immunizations and Family Planning, 10 a.m.-ll a.m. Greenville Town Hall, 283-6330. Workshop for Plumas Artists, 2-4:30 p.m., Green Meadows Community Room, of Hot Springs Road. 284-7069. Plumas County Fish and Game Commission, 7 p.m., Quincy Veterans Hall, Lawrence Street. Friday, April 6 Sewing, Crafts and Coffee, 11 a.m.-noon, Taylorsville Com- munity United Methodist Church, Nelson Street, 284-7861 or 284-7670. National Association of Re- tired Federal Employees, noon. Mountain View Manor Community Room, 283-4996. Order of the Eastern Star, Masonic Temple, 7 p.m. Main St. Greenville. Friday Night for Teens, 7-10 p.m., at the Indian Valley Com- munity Center, Highway 89, Greenville, across from Pine Street. Call 284-1560. AA Big Book/Step Study, 7 p.m., First Baptist Church, Hot Springs Road, Greenville. Earthquake Report March 15-21,201; By: Charles P. Watson, California Professional Geologist No. 7818 Saturday, April 7 Celebrating Recovery, free dinner 5 p.m., worship at 6 p.m., and group meeting at 7 p.m. Lake Almanor Community Church, 2610 Hwy A-13. Call 596-3683. Childcare provided. Taylorsville Community Grange, 6 p.m. Main Street, Taylorsville. Call 284-6618. I BREAKING I A,  : i " 00NEWSI L:00I' I Greenville Streetscape Com- mittee, 6:30 p.m., Call for meet- ing location, 284-6929. Wolf Creek 4-H, 7 p.m., First Baptist Church, Hot Springs Road. Call advisor Randy Hov- land, 284-1545. Monday, April 9 Taylorsville After-School Program, 1:45 p.m., Tay- lorsville Community United Methodist Church. Call 284- 7532. AA, 7 p.m., First Lutheran Church, Bush Street, Greenville. Tuesday, April 10 Taylorsville Quilting and Sewing Group, 10:30 a.m., with potluck at noon. Wednesday, April 11 Mental Health Advisory Board, Noon. Call for location, 283-6307. Family Night, 5:30 p.m., Roundhouse Council, 330 Bush St., Greenville, 284-6866. A1-Anon, 5:30 p.m., at the Grange Hall in Taylorsville. Greenville Rotary, 6 p.m., In- dian Valley Community Center Conference Room, Highway 89, Greenville. Sierra Cascade Street Rod- ders, 6 p.m., Champions Pizza, Quincy, 283-0284. Indian Valley Community Services District, 6:30 p.m., In- dian Valley Civic Center, 284- 7224. Greenville Public Library 204 Ann St. * 284-7416 Mon., Tues., Wed.: 10 a.m.-1 p.m,, 1:30-5:30p.m. Thursday: 12 p.m.-4 p.m., 4:30-7 p.m. To update Calendar info, email aknadler@plumasnewsacom or call 284-7800. ,,We Rock!" Advanced Geologic Exploration, Inc. Scientists of the Earth TM 180 Main St. P.O. Box 1956 Chester CA 96020 (530) 258-4228 Need help assessing the gold potential on your claim? Call usl m i T .... I ):, 71,1,11 1 F l, I I ITI  llll! LAST WEEK'S TEMPERATURES DATE HIGH LOW March 26 46 30 March 27 46 38 March 28 51 33 March 29 50 39 March 30 58 40 March 31 56 34 April 1 48 32 April 2 -- 28 Total Precip: 21.10 to date; Last Year this date: 40.78. Season is July I to June 30 Compiled by Raymond Hunt Today's Weather LAKE LEVELS Lake Almanor *Elevation tCurrent 4,489.27 1 Year Ago 4,485.45 Lake Almanor **Capacity tCurrent 1,017,181 1 Year Ago 919,688 Bucks Lake *Elevation tCurrent 5,145.86 1 Year Ago 5,139.37 Bucks Lake **Capacity tCurrent 85,750 1 Year Ago 74,860 *Elevation above sea level in ft. **Storage in acre ft. 1" April 1,2012 April 3, 2Oll # ":. %., 44/28 Morning showers. Highs in the mid 40s ano lows in the up- per 20s. Sunrise Sumret 6:42 AM 7:32 PM # :.. Z !:-_. 41/28 Few showers, Highs in the low 4Os and lows in the upper 20s. Sunrise Sunset 6:40 AM 7:33 PM 46/30 ore sun than clouds Highs in the m 40s and lows in the low 30s. Sunrise Sunset 6:39 AM 7:34 PM California At A Glance 54/35 Sunshine. Hjhs in the mid 50S aild lows in the into 30s. Sunrise Sunset 6:37 AM 7:35 PM 60/39 Mix of sun and clouds, Highs in the low 60s and lows in the. upper 30s. Sunrise Sunset 6:36 AM 7:36 PM 44128 San 63/54 Ares Cities a., ILm. Anaheim 72 50 gt sunny Modesto Bakersfield 70 43 msl sunny Mojave Barstow 77 42 pt sunny Monterey Slylhe 90 57 rest sunny Needles Chico 58 37 pt sunny Oakland Costa Mesa 68 53 pt sunny Palmdale I[1/llL I71 l,ltllll 111111111 1 [ .... Moon Phases t? @ First Full Mar 30 Apt 6 @ Last New Apr 13 Apr 21 UV Index Wed 4/4  High Thu 4/5 High Fri 4/6 High :::*v*: Sat 4/7 High iqii:/;i}}i Sun 418 High The UV Index is measured on a o-11 number scale, with a higher UV Index showing the need for reater skin pro- ...... ']ll Imr ,--m,l,i 63 40 rest sunny Salinas 61 42 mst sunny 67 38 pt sunny San Bernsrdino 75 48  sunny 56 44 rsst sunny San Diego 63 54 pt sunny 90 63 pt sunny San Francisco 56 45 mst sunny 57 42 rsst sunny San Jose 60 42 mst sunny 72 37 ot sunny Santa Barbara 65 46 Lot sunny 1 lT, I ...... ,;777 ...... 7Trl CHURCHES Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter Day Saints, 284-7517 or 284- 1414, Hideway Rd.. Greenville First Baptist, 284-7714, 133 Hot Springs Rd.. Greenville. Christ the Redeemei' Church, 284- 1003, 120 Bush St., Greenville, ctrangli- can.org. First Lutheran, 284-7683, 116 Bush St., Greenville. Greenville Assembly of God, 284- 6586, Forgay & Setzer, Greenville. Indian Mission Full Gospel, N. Valley Rd., Greenville. Kingdom Hall Of Jehovah's Wit- nesses, 284-6006, 1192 N. Valley Rd., Greenville Seventh-Day Adventist, 310-2042, Hwy. 89, next to Sierra Sunrise Greenville. Southern Baptist, 284-7522, 241 Greenville Wolf Creek Rd., Greenville. St. Anthony's Catholic Father Larry Beck. Jessie Street, Greenville. 283-0890. Sunday Mass, 11 a.m.; Thursday Mass, nooc Community United Methodist Churches of Greenville and Tay- Iorsville, 284-7316, 212 Pine St., Greenville and Nelson & Warren St., Tay- Iorsville. Christ the Redeemer Church, 284- 1003, First Lutheran, 120 Bush St., Greenville., ctrandlican.org. I 1 .s 51 , 11:31 a.m. =l T -?fs--, i I . " .,.-" ,P.. '%. .... k I :3p. C "v'''' i W ' 4b Jilt o:; 4;,=4: v'v00 \\; " %v, ,_. }' / .... V _,-'"- T"d"tll ./ 3:S10".Tm. Regional 7 1 O[ 8 Previous week 9 0 0 IL was another quiet seismic week in Northeastern California as the number of earthquakes remained at the single-digit level for the second consecutive week. The last time back-to-back weeks of activity this low ha ;pened in early July of last year. nine months ago. Seismicity has remained between 8-10 events for the last three weeks. The largest quake measured M 2.5 and with that, it broke last week's gap in M 2. activity. Two consecutive weeks without a quake registering 12.0 or stronger has not occurred since June-July of last year. The quake occurred at 5:45 p.m. Monday, March 19. about 42 miles north of Reno and at the northwest shoreline of Pyramid Lake, at the Needles. The quake passed without any official felt reports. The needles at Pyramid Lake are tufa or calcium carbonate deposits formed by the precipitation of hot geo- thermal fluids that rise along the open fractures asociated with the Pyramid Lake Fault Zone. Three quakes occurred west of Chester. ..... iTalT[ Filiill]f|lllillll/l/i,,- : - f - ,j 8A Wednesday, April 4, 2012 Indian Valley Record Children enjoy splashing in the community pool last year, but $5,000 is needed by May 1 in order to open it this year. Photo by Alicia Knadler $ 5,000 needed to open pool Alicia Knadler Indian Valley Editor aknadler@plumasnews.com Residents and business owners are asked to help open the Indian Valley Community Pool this year, which will take $5,000. Indian Valley Recreation' and Parks District directors appointed a committee to operate the pool, and mem- bers are working hard to raise the money by May 1. They are selling member- ships now, and will gladly accept donations, which can be tax deductible. Membership levels are as follows: Early bird members who join before June 1 may do so for $120, and $8 for each additional family member. After that, memberships will be $140, and $10 for each additional family member. Individuals can join for $60 before June 1, and $70 after. There will also be lower daily admission. It costs more than $10,000 each summer for pool oper- ations and maintenance. Unlike other recreation districts, Indian Valley does not receive any tax money. All programming is de- pendent on private funds, through fundraising efforts and fees for programs. At the pool, this money comes from admission, memberships and classes such as swim lessons and. water aerobics. Committee members would like to develop more programs, like classes for seniors and individuals with disabilities. "It will take the whole community to get the pool open this year," committee member Doti McDowell said. For more information or to help, call Doti McDowell at 284-7532. Opportunities for education funding American Iris Society Scholarship, $500 Open to high school seniors in Northern California pursu- ing a career in horticulture, landscaping, nursery produc- tion or related field. For appli- cation, contact high school counselor. Deadline: April 6. Northern California Golf Association, $4,000 - $5,OOO Eleven scholarships avail- able to high school seniors (9.0 GPA required) who plan to at- tend a four-year college or university. Based on merit and need. For application, vis- it Youth on Course at youthoncourse.org. Deadline: April 13. Plumas District Hospital Volunteers Scholarship, $2,000. Two scholarships available to residents or high school graduates within Plumas Hos- pital District who are pursu- ing a career in health care. Applicants must have com- pleted at least one year of aca- demic studies in a health-re- lated curriculum or one year of employment in a health re- lated program. Applications available at pdh.org (select Volunteers from left menu, then Scholarships from right menu) and frc.edu/financial aid/types.htm#Scholarships. GETTING AN EDUCATION For information, call scholar- ship chairwoman Helen Ettinger, 283-3621. Deadline: April 13. California Retired Teachers Association Division 76, $500 Three scholarships avail- able to local high school se- niors with a 3.0 GPA who plan to attend college, university, junior college or trade school. Requires a one-page biogra- phy. Obtain application from high school counselor's office. Deadline: April 18. Plumas County Bar Associ- ation, $1,000 Preference given to a Plumas County high school .senior attending a four-year college or university. Five hundred word essay required. Obtain application from high school counselor's office. Deadline: April 27. Cien Amigos - IME Becas Scholarship Fund, $1,000 Fifty scholarships available to high school seniors from low-income households of Mexican/Latino heritage who plan to enroll at a public or private university or college. Must have GPA of 2.5 or higher. Obtai n applica- tion from high school coun- selor's Office or visit 100amigos-imebecas.org. Deadline: April 30: Cien Amigos - IME Becas High School Grants, $300 One hundred grants avail- able to high school juniors and seniors from low-income households of Mexi- can/Latino heritage for finan- cial support for college appli- cation or SAT fees. Must have GPA of 2.5 or higher. Obtain application from high school counselor's office or visit 100amigos-infebecas.org. Deadline: April 30. Plumas-Sierra Cattle- Women Scholarship, $1,000 Open to students whose ma- jor income is agriculture-re- lated, or who are majoring in agriculture-related field. Stu- dents may apply for a second- year award of $500. Printed applications available in Plumas and Sierra county schools. Completed applica- tion must be sent to scholar- ship chairwoman Maureen Kimberling, P.O. Box 356, Chilcoot, CA 96105; phone 993- 4036. Deadline: April 30. Reno High Sierra Chapter Ninety-Nines Scholarship, $5,OOO Open to all current female student pilots working on a private pilot certificate. To apply, visit renohighsierra 99s.org. Deadline: April 30 Aspiring Animation Profes- sional Scholarship, $1,000 Open to high school seniors interested in an animation-re- lated career. Requires applica- tion and essay. May be used to attend any accredited school or college. For application, visit AnimationCareer Review.com. Deadline: May 1. Plumas Association of Re- altors Leonard H.A. Franz Scholarship, $600 Open to high school seniors with a 3.0 GPA who plan to at- tend a two- or four-year col- lege or vocational school. Community service or work experience desired. For appli- cation, contact high school counselor. Deadline: May 9. Youth Automobile Safety Scholarship, $250 - $1,500 Open to high school seniors whose parents are full-time or retired public employees. Re- quires essay about ways to re- duce accident rates among teenagers. To apply, visit cseinsurance.comTscholarship. htm. Deadline: May 11. Bill to repeal fire tax passes committee North State Assemblyman and Chief Republican Whip Dan Logue announced last week that a bill he coau- thored to repeal the "fire tax" has passed its first commit- tee. Assembly Bill 1506, au- thored by Assemblyman Kevin Jeffries, was approved by the Assembly Committee on Natural Resources with strong bipartisan support. "It is encouraging to see Democrats and Republi- cans in agreement on this issue," said Logue. "Rural homeowners should not have to suffer another oppressive tax." Assembly Bill 1506 will re- peal the state responsibility area fire prevention fee (aka the fire tax) that was passed last year as part of the major- ity party budget. In January the state Board of Forestry and Fire Protection enacted regulations for the collection of $150 for each "habitable structure" on a property owner's land. The Howard Jarvis Tax- payers Association an- nounced that it would sue to stop the implementation of this fee because it violates the California Constitution as an illegally enacted tax. The bill enacting the fire tax was passed without the re- quired two-thirds vote for new taxes and fees. "Even Democrats are beginning to realize that this tax is not what the governor said it would be," Logue explained. "Rural homeown- ers already pay for fire protection through property taxes, income taxes and local fire district assessments, so this is plain and simple an unfair tax." AB 1506 will have its next hearing before the Assembly Appropriations Committee in April. Logue represents the Califor- nia Legislature's 3rd Assem- bly District, which includes the communities of Butte, Lassen, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sierra and Yuba. MMUNITY CORNER WEEKLY CALENDAR Thursday, April 5 WIC Program, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Indian Valley Resource Center, Main St., Greenville, 283-4093 or 1-800-WIC-4093. Immunizations and Family Planning, 10 a.m.-ll a.m. Greenville Town Hall, 283-6330. Workshop for Plumas Artists, 2-4:30 p.m., Green Meadows Community Room, of Hot Springs Road. 284-7069. Plumas County Fish and Game Commission, 7 p.m., Quincy Veterans Hall, Lawrence Street. Friday, April 6 Sewing, Crafts and Coffee, 11 a.m.-noon, Taylorsville Com- munity United Methodist Church, Nelson Street, 284-7861 or 284-7670. National Association of Re- tired Federal Employees, noon. Mountain View Manor Community Room, 283-4996. Order of the Eastern Star, Masonic Temple, 7 p.m. Main St. Greenville. Friday Night for Teens, 7-10 p.m., at the Indian Valley Com- munity Center, Highway 89, Greenville, across from Pine Street. Call 284-1560. AA Big Book/Step Study, 7 p.m., First Baptist Church, Hot Springs Road, Greenville. Earthquake Report March 15-21,201; By: Charles P. Watson, California Professional Geologist No. 7818 Saturday, April 7 Celebrating Recovery, free dinner 5 p.m., worship at 6 p.m., and group meeting at 7 p.m. Lake Almanor Community Church, 2610 Hwy A-13. Call 596-3683. Childcare provided. Taylorsville Community Grange, 6 p.m. Main Street, Taylorsville. Call 284-6618. I BREAKING I A,  : i " 00NEWSI L:00I' I Greenville Streetscape Com- mittee, 6:30 p.m., Call for meet- ing location, 284-6929. Wolf Creek 4-H, 7 p.m., First Baptist Church, Hot Springs Road. Call advisor Randy Hov- land, 284-1545. Monday, April 9 Taylorsville After-School Program, 1:45 p.m., Tay- lorsville Community United Methodist Church. Call 284- 7532. AA, 7 p.m., First Lutheran Church, Bush Street, Greenville. Tuesday, April 10 Taylorsville Quilting and Sewing Group, 10:30 a.m., with potluck at noon. Wednesday, April 11 Mental Health Advisory Board, Noon. Call for location, 283-6307. Family Night, 5:30 p.m., Roundhouse Council, 330 Bush St., Greenville, 284-6866. A1-Anon, 5:30 p.m., at the Grange Hall in Taylorsville. Greenville Rotary, 6 p.m., In- dian Valley Community Center Conference Room, Highway 89, Greenville. Sierra Cascade Street Rod- ders, 6 p.m., Champions Pizza, Quincy, 283-0284. Indian Valley Community Services District, 6:30 p.m., In- dian Valley Civic Center, 284- 7224. Greenville Public Library 204 Ann St. * 284-7416 Mon., Tues., Wed.: 10 a.m.-1 p.m,, 1:30-5:30p.m. Thursday: 12 p.m.-4 p.m., 4:30-7 p.m. To update Calendar info, email aknadler@plumasnewsacom or call 284-7800. ,,We Rock!" Advanced Geologic Exploration, Inc. Scientists of the Earth TM 180 Main St. P.O. Box 1956 Chester CA 96020 (530) 258-4228 Need help assessing the gold potential on your claim? Call usl m i T .... I ):, 71,1,11 1 F l, I I ITI  llll! LAST WEEK'S TEMPERATURES DATE HIGH LOW March 26 46 30 March 27 46 38 March 28 51 33 March 29 50 39 March 30 58 40 March 31 56 34 April 1 48 32 April 2 -- 28 Total Precip: 21.10 to date; Last Year this date: 40.78. Season is July I to June 30 Compiled by Raymond Hunt Today's Weather LAKE LEVELS Lake Almanor *Elevation tCurrent 4,489.27 1 Year Ago 4,485.45 Lake Almanor **Capacity tCurrent 1,017,181 1 Year Ago 919,688 Bucks Lake *Elevation tCurrent 5,145.86 1 Year Ago 5,139.37 Bucks Lake **Capacity tCurrent 85,750 1 Year Ago 74,860 *Elevation above sea level in ft. **Storage in acre ft. 1" April 1,2012 April 3, 2Oll # ":. %., 44/28 Morning showers. Highs in the mid 40s ano lows in the up- per 20s. Sunrise Sumret 6:42 AM 7:32 PM # :.. Z !:-_. 41/28 Few showers, Highs in the low 4Os and lows in the upper 20s. Sunrise Sunset 6:40 AM 7:33 PM 46/30 ore sun than clouds Highs in the m 40s and lows in the low 30s. Sunrise Sunset 6:39 AM 7:34 PM California At A Glance 54/35 Sunshine. Hjhs in the mid 50S aild lows in the into 30s. Sunrise Sunset 6:37 AM 7:35 PM 60/39 Mix of sun and clouds, Highs in the low 60s and lows in the. upper 30s. Sunrise Sunset 6:36 AM 7:36 PM 44128 San 63/54 Ares Cities a., ILm. Anaheim 72 50 gt sunny Modesto Bakersfield 70 43 msl sunny Mojave Barstow 77 42 pt sunny Monterey Slylhe 90 57 rest sunny Needles Chico 58 37 pt sunny Oakland Costa Mesa 68 53 pt sunny Palmdale I[1/llL I71 l,ltllll 111111111 1 [ .... Moon Phases t? @ First Full Mar 30 Apt 6 @ Last New Apr 13 Apr 21 UV Index Wed 4/4  High Thu 4/5 High Fri 4/6 High :::*v*: Sat 4/7 High iqii:/;i}}i Sun 418 High The UV Index is measured on a o-11 number scale, with a higher UV Index showing the need for reater skin pro- ...... ']ll Imr ,--m,l,i 63 40 rest sunny Salinas 61 42 mst sunny 67 38 pt sunny San Bernsrdino 75 48  sunny 56 44 rsst sunny San Diego 63 54 pt sunny 90 63 pt sunny San Francisco 56 45 mst sunny 57 42 rsst sunny San Jose 60 42 mst sunny 72 37 ot sunny Santa Barbara 65 46 Lot sunny 1 lT, I ...... ,;777 ...... 7Trl CHURCHES Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter Day Saints, 284-7517 or 284- 1414, Hideway Rd.. Greenville First Baptist, 284-7714, 133 Hot Springs Rd.. Greenville. Christ the Redeemei' Church, 284- 1003, 120 Bush St., Greenville, ctrangli- can.org. First Lutheran, 284-7683, 116 Bush St., Greenville. Greenville Assembly of God, 284- 6586, Forgay & Setzer, Greenville. Indian Mission Full Gospel, N. Valley Rd., Greenville. Kingdom Hall Of Jehovah's Wit- nesses, 284-6006, 1192 N. Valley Rd., Greenville Seventh-Day Adventist, 310-2042, Hwy. 89, next to Sierra Sunrise Greenville. Southern Baptist, 284-7522, 241 Greenville Wolf Creek Rd., Greenville. St. Anthony's Catholic Father Larry Beck. Jessie Street, Greenville. 283-0890. Sunday Mass, 11 a.m.; Thursday Mass, nooc Community United Methodist Churches of Greenville and Tay- Iorsville, 284-7316, 212 Pine St., Greenville and Nelson & Warren St., Tay- Iorsville. Christ the Redeemer Church, 284- 1003, First Lutheran, 120 Bush St., Greenville., ctrandlican.org. I 1 .s 51 , 11:31 a.m. =l T -?fs--, i I . " .,.-" ,P.. '%. .... k I :3p. C "v'''' i W ' 4b Jilt o:; 4;,=4: v'v00 \\; " %v, ,_. }' / .... V _,-'"- T"d"tll ./ 3:S10".Tm. Regional 7 1 O[ 8 Previous week 9 0 0 IL was another quiet seismic week in Northeastern California as the number of earthquakes remained at the single-digit level for the second consecutive week. The last time back-to-back weeks of activity this low ha ;pened in early July of last year. nine months ago. Seismicity has remained between 8-10 events for the last three weeks. The largest quake measured M 2.5 and with that, it broke last week's gap in M 2. activity. Two consecutive weeks without a quake registering 12.0 or stronger has not occurred since June-July of last year. The quake occurred at 5:45 p.m. Monday, March 19. about 42 miles north of Reno and at the northwest shoreline of Pyramid Lake, at the Needles. The quake passed without any official felt reports. The needles at Pyramid Lake are tufa or calcium carbonate deposits formed by the precipitation of hot geo- thermal fluids that rise along the open fractures asociated with the Pyramid Lake Fault Zone. Three quakes occurred west of Chester. ..... iTalT[ Filiill]f|lllillll/l/i,,- : - f - ,j