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March 27, 2013     Indian Valley Record
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Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter Wednesday, March 27, 2013 3B Theater popcorn can full of ,health hazar00 !, : Q: Mr. Norris, if there's a downfall in my diet, it's at the movie theater. I especial- ly love hot buttered popcorn. But what's its nutritional worth? My wife told me about your column, so I said, "I'll ask Chuck!" --"Bellyful of Buttered Popcorn" Birmingham, Ala. A: I remember going as a young boy with my brothers, Wieland and Aaron, to the only movie theater in Wilson, 0kla., where, for a dime, we could spend all Saturday af. ternoon watching the double feature and the serials. (Am I dating myself?.) We loved those Saturdays. With a nickel bag of popcorn on our laps, we could escape into another world. We went to Casablanca with Humphrey Bogart, and Cary Grant took us to India. My fa- vorite movies, however, wei'e Westerns, especially ones with John Wayne. For those few hours in the movie theater When I was watching a movie starring "The Duke," I bemehim. As an adult, I even tried to carry some of those positive ]L C-FORCE HEALTH AND FITNESS CHUCK NORRIS info@creators.corn cowboy characteristics into the 10 years of shooting my television series, "Walker, Texas Ranger." I still love the movies and a bag of popcorn as much as anyone, but there are some kernels of truth about the killer parts of theater pop- corn. Last week, I conveyed the incredible value in regular air-popped popcorn. But when it's meshed in with the cocktail of salts, oils and oth- er synthetic ingredients in some movie popcorn, the re- sults can be hazardous. In 2009, the Center for Sci- ence in the Public Interest did a national study on pop- corns and sodas sold in three of the largest theater chains across the country -- Regal Entertainment Group, AMC and Cinemark. CSPI submit- ted samples for independent laboratory analyses regard- ing their nutritional value. It was the second study CSPI had conducted in 15 years (see http://bit.ly/1CmGgc), with little to no variation in the findings. Here are some of the results: A medium-sized popcorn (20 cups) and a medium soda from Regal theaters carried the nutritional equivalent of three McDonald's Quarter Pounders topped with 12 pats of butter. The popcorn alone (without the butter) con- tained 1,200 calories, 60 grams of saturated fat and 980 milligrams of sodium. If you bought a package of can- dy with that popcorn, you could add 300 to 1,100 empty calories (plus at least a half- day's worth of saturated fat if it's chocolate). A medium popcorn (9 cups) from AMC theaters, the sec- ond-largest U.S. theater chain, did a little better, but that was mostly because of its smaller size: 590 calories and 33 grams of saturated fat. A medium popcorn (14 cups) from Cinemark,'the third-largest theater chain, had 760 calories but only 3 grams of saturated fat. Let's not forget that the above stats don't include the second bucket of popcorn some theaters offer for free when you buy a large one. Add to all of that the double trouble I explained last week that happens when we eat in front of the tube; the same is true in theater seats: Munch- ing in the movies has the double whammy of giving you a truckload of calories while you're not burning any in the activity. The excessive saturated fat in Regal's and AMC's pop- corn is because of the fact that their popcorn is popped in coconut oil, which -- though it's becoming "the darling of the natural-foods world," according to The New York Times -- is about 90 percent saturated fat. Cinemark, however, changed to canola oil -- re: suiting in much less saturat- ed fat, for which Jayne Hur- ley, senior nutritionist fit CSPI, gave a round of ap- plause: "Cinemark gets a thumbs-up for switching." And all the theater chains get high-fives for knocking out" the trans fatty acids by ceas-- ing to use partially hydro- genated oils in their butter- flavored toppings. Marisa Moore -- a spokes- woman for the American Di- etetic Association, a nonprof- it association of nutritionists -- recently explained to the Times that the primary satu- rated fat in coconut oil is the "good" lauric acid. Neverthe- less, new federal dietary guidelines recommend that no more than 10 percent of to- tal daily dietary calories. come from saturated fat only 20 grams of a 2,000-calo- rie diet. After CSPI's initial pop- corn report in 1994, "many cinema operators responded by offering their patrons ad- ditional choices, such as air- popped popcorn," the Nation- al Association of Theatre Owners said in a statement. Though I personally haven't seen those healthy alterna- tives in any theaters, I would love to, and I bet you would, too. With the waves of health and fitness increasing over the years, it's high time for Americans to communicate to local theater management about the hazardous kernels popping in their cinemas. And while you're at it, you might want to ask about the origin of the popcorn and en- sure that it's organic and not genetically modified. Imagine the statement the- ater chains could make today if they offered and advertised those healthier alternatives to a more health-conscious America. The truth is, as with so many other foods and snacks, not all popcorn.s are created equal. So we need to be wise when it even comes to kernel consumption. For our health's sake, if we can't for- go the popcorn in theaters, we should at least refuse the additional butter, bail on the buckets and opt for a small bag instead. Write to Chuck Norris (in. fo@cretors.com) with questions a bout health and fitness. Copyright 2013 Chuck Norris Distributed by creators.cam SHERIFF'S BLOTTER Arrests Chester One person was arrested on a charge of violating probation and resisting arrest. Two people were arrested on a charge of DUI. One person was arrested on charges of public intoxication, violating probation and resist- ing arrest. One person was arrested on a charge of threatening bodily harm. Greenville One person was arrested on a charge of public intoxication. Portola , i:: One person was arrested on a charge of being under the influ- ence of a controlled substance. One person was arrested on a charge of DUI. Quincy Three people were arrested on a charge of DUI. One person was arrested on a charge of being under the influ- ence of a controlled substance. Two people were arrested on a charge of public intoxication. One person was arrested on charges of public intoxication and resisting arrest. One person was arrested on a charge of resisting arrest after being served a warrant. One person was arrested on charges of being in possession of a controlled substance, being in possession of drug parapher. nalia and being under the influ- ence of a controlled substance. Fire Friday, March 15 Smoke: In Clio, a caller report- ed seeing smoke in the area of Calf Pasture Rd. The call was transferred to the US Forest Service. Medical Wednesday, March 13 Airway: in Portola, a caller re- ported that he was having trou- ble breathing. The call was transferred to Eastern Plumas Health Care. Portola/Eastern Plumas fire was paged. Airway: In Chester, a caller re- ported that she needed an am- bulance for an ill elderly male who had pneumonia and was refusing an ambulance. The call requested an ambulance be dispatched. The-call was trans- ferred to Susanville Intera- gency Fire Center. Airway: In Greenville, a caller requested an ambulance for a male who had shortness of breath and was having difficul- ty focusing. The call was trans- ferred to South Lassen EMS. In- dian Valley fire was paged. A deputy responded. Unknown malady: In Quincy, a caller requested an ambulance for unknown reasons. The call was transferred to PDH. Thursday, March 14 Airway: In Portola, a caller re- quested an ambulance for her father who was having difficul- ty breathing. She said she could not get him up. The call was transferred to EPHC. Por- tola fire was paged and re- sponded. Fall: In Greenville, a caller re- ported that his neighbor fell from an apple tree and was still on the ground. The call said the neighbor was alert and breath- ing but was in a lot of pain and could not move. The call was transferred to SLEMS. Indian Valley/Crescent Mills fire was paged and responded. Airway: In Quincy, a caller re- ported a 12-year-old girl was having a severe asthma attack. The call was transferred to Plumas District Hospital. PDH and Quincy fire were paged. General illness: In Portola, a caller requested medical aid for herself because of general ill- ness. She said she didn't have access to a vehicle. The call was transferred to EPHC. Eastern Plumas/Portola fire was paged. Accident: In Portola, a caller reported a motorcycle was down and the rider was not get- ting up. The call was trans- ferred to the CHP. A second 911 call was transferred to EPHC. Eastern Plumas/Portola fire was paged. Airway: In Greenville, a caller reported he was having diffi- culty breathing. The call was transferred to SLEMS. Indian Valley/CrescentMills fire was paged. Friday, March 15 Knee: In Quincy, a caller re- ported that her daughter need- ed an ambulance because of knee pain. The call was trans- ferred to PDH. PDH and Quincy fire were paged. Stroke: At Lake Almanor, a caller requested an ambulance for his wife who was having a stroke. The call was trans- ferred to SIFC. Airway: In Portola, a caller re- quested an ambulance for her father who was having difficul- ty breathing. The call was transferred to EPHC. Eastern Plumas/Portola fire was paged and responded. Anxiety: In Quincy, a caller re- quested medical aid for herself because of severe anxiety. The information was transferred to PDH. PDH and Quincy fire were paged. Dementia: In Chester, a caller requested an ambulance for his mother who had dementia and was "snapping." The caller said the victim was feeling faint. The call-was transferred to SIFC. Saturday, March 16 Altered: In Portola, a caller re- quested medical help for an 84- year-old female who was in an altered state of consciousness. The information was tranS- ferred to EPHC. Eastern Plumas/Portola fire was paged. Diabetic: In Portola, a caller re- quested medical aid for a male who was having a diabetic episode. The call was trans- ferred to EPHC. Eastern All inspirational items! just in time for Easter *Offer good thru 3/30/13 "%.  2019 East Main St., Quincy : ::'  283-2929 www.quincyhotspot.com iiy Tues-Fri 9:30am-5:30pm Sat 10am-4pm Closed Sun & Man . . : ========================= Get quotes on AAA Home and Auto Insurance now and receive up to two FREE portable speakers. Bob Phelps Insurance Agent Lic #0579096 252-5014 Fax 257-3762 Cell 386-3515 email: robert.phelps@goAAA.com 2920 D Main St., Susanville CA Plumas/Portola fire was paged. A deputy was advised. Sunday, March 17 Cardiac: In Beckwourth, a caller requested an ambulance for a female in her 20s who was having chest pain. The infor- mation was transferred to EPHC. Beckwourth fire was paged. Monday, March 18 Seizure: In Quincy, a caller re- quested medical help for her mother who was having a seizure. The call was trans- ferred to PDH. Quincy fire was paged. Shoulder: At Lake Almanor, a caller requested medical aid for his wife who fell off her bicycle and injured her shoulder. The call was transferred to SIFC. Passed out: In Chester, a caller requested an ambulance for a man who had passed out. The call was transferred to SIFC. Fall: In Chester, a caller re- quested an ambulance for her husband who had fallen. The call was transferred to SIFC. Tuesday, March 19 Fall: In Graeagle, a caller re- quested an ambulance for an 83-year-old fall victim. The call was transferred to EPHC. Graeagle fire was paged. Miscellaneous Wednesday, March 13 Dangerous flying: In Graeagle, a caller reported two or three people were flying a remote- control helicopter in the middle of the street. The caller said they were flying the helicopter in and around moving traffic near the Mill Pond. The caller said they almost landed the he- licopter on her car. The infor- mation was transferred to the CHP. Where in the World00' Quincy resident Mary Miles holds up the Feather River Bulletin on her recent visit to Iguazu Falls, Argentina, during a six-week trip to South America. Next time you travel, share where you went by taking your local newspaper along and including it in a photo. Then email the photo to dmcdonald@plumasnews.com. f Healthy , Sexuality Let's find out. Parenting Forum * Mind the Gap What's We need your heart-feh participation in an open discussion on the changing dynamics of healthy sexuality. How do we stick to our family values, in spite of the pres- sure of the media and peers? How do we talk to our children so that they hear us? Are we aware of the influence that we have on our kids? What do they want? Are we aware of the gaps in com- I munication with each other and with our kids, about this diverse and rather tender subject? Saturday, April 13, 10:00 a.m - 12:30 p.m. | I Please join our panel at ! i West End Theatre, Corner of Hwy 70 & Main Street in Quincy ! Please show up and give us your input. This is a FREE event, sponsored by PCIRC. ,, L For more information, please call 530-283-5515, extension 15 J 1 i i ! i I | | Court Mandated & DHV Required Programs Helping People Successfully Satisfy Their Court & DMV Requirements At These Locations: Chester- 200 Main St. Greenville - 209 Hwy. 89 Portola - 500 First Avenue Quincy- 173 Lawrence Street John Banks 'i Farina rein formation, con tact ="" Plumas Sierra Community Solutions (530) 283-9678 pscs@digitalpath.net * www.rduiprogram.com